Bitcoin and remittance, where are we? - Fintastico

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Huge milestone for us: Our Bitcoin Remittance startup Rebit.ph just fulfilled more remittances in just one day today than in our entire first month combined.

Huge milestone for us: Our Bitcoin Remittance startup Rebit.ph just fulfilled more remittances in just one day today than in our entire first month combined. submitted by Godfreee to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Take it from a recovering Bitcoin Remittance startup guy: Bitcoin doesn't actually make remittances cheaper

Take it from a recovering Bitcoin Remittance startup guy: Bitcoin doesn't actually make remittances cheaper submitted by helloluis to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Almost exactly one year ago, we launched our Bitcoin remittance startup in the Philippines. Against the odds, our growth has been the exact opposite of the downtrend in bitcoin price. Just wanted to share a bit of our story so far.

Warning: Lengthy post. There's a TL;DR down there if you scroll down long enough ;)
How we started:
Twelve months ago, Bitcoin had just bounced back to $600~, everyone was pumped for another bull run, and we were a brand-spanking new bitcoin startup that had just launched a Bitcoin payment processor in the Philippines. We were fresh, hungry, and excited. Remittance wasn't part of our original plan, but after a few brainstorming sessions, we decided that it was going to be a vital stepping stone to support a healthy bitcoin ecosystem in our country. We decided to launch what we called a “Rebittance” service, a word that is now included in the Money Wiki and describes bitcoin remittance in general. We were going to call it Rebit.ph.
Early days:
So we announced our “launch”, if you can call it that, on social media and here on Reddit. Other than making it to the top of bitcoin, it was somewhat uneventful. Our first month was OK, seeing 1 or 2 transactions per day, getting sign ups here and there. We absorbed the things that we saw work, and removed the things that didn't. We focused a lot on customer service and speed of transaction fulfillment with our first few regular users, and it paid off as a lot of them are still regular customers up to this day.
Several months after we figured out the ins and outs of the business, we were getting more comfortable with handling more transactions. Our growth was slow and steady at first, but then we made a decision to just do away with the transfer fee. This caused an uptick in our numbers, to the point where we sometimes had to scramble to make sure we could accommodate all rebittances. We were still bootstrapping at that point, and cash wasn't exactly overflowing; besides, we were also busy launching five other services at the same time.
This is the part that most people do not know about us: Our startup is actually called Satoshi Citadel Industries, and Rebit is just one major component in an ecosystem that we are working on establishing. Rebit is our “Bitcoin-In” piece of the puzzle, and our other major verticals complement this system. It has been the most active and rapidly developing service in our lineup, hence our heightened focus on making it as effective and efficient as possible.
2015:
2015 has been a breakout year for us. Despite all the challenges of a depressing market trend, we were able to secure fresh capital from angel investors to push us forward. We have since figured out our strategy and direction, had opened up Rebittance partnerships in different countries like Hong Kong and Canada, and are now working on opening up at least ten more corridors within the next year. We have been breaking our daily, weekly, and monthly records almost every month, and we expect that trend to sustain regardless of the price of bitcoin.
From the time we started a year ago doing 1 or 2 transactions a day, we're now doing at least fifty times more on a daily basis. The number of registered users, coming from about 19 different countries, has already zoomed past the 6,000 mark, and we're looking forward to reaching 10,000 in the very near future with new partnerships from other remittance corridors putting us on track to service about a dozen new markets by 2016. Rebittance, a funny word we like to think we invented, is now a real thing. Believe it or not, the business is now healthy enough to be able to sustain itself in the short term without burning through cash. It is not only surviving, it is thriving.
Looking forward:
Our vision looking forward has always been the same: World Domination. Well, not really. We just want to make an impact in an industry that is ripe for disruption, starting in our own backyard, the Philippines. We know that Remittance is a hotly contested market right now, with several billion dollars moving into the Fintech space, a growing new sector where technology meets finance, and the Philippines is one of the main battle grounds with $27 Billion in annual incoming remittances. We're gearing up to become a major player in this disruptive industry, starting here in our own home court.
Our long term strategy is to be able to replicate our service anywhere in the world, and create partnerships that connect us to other Bitcoin companies that will allow anyone, anywhere to easily access Rebittance services. Our first step is Rebittance.org, which recently won 3rd place in Coinbase's BitHack v2. It's a Rebittance portal that will act as an aggregator and connector for the rest of the world. We have more up our sleeve too. In the meantime, we keep working.
Like everything worth doing, it is going to take some more time to reach even just our short-term goals. Just getting the proper licenses from government agencies here takes weeks if not months, same with establishing one partnership with another company in a different country. All of the things we have accomplished up to this point took a lot of time and effort, and it will only become tougher as we grow bigger.
Looking back from this milestone definitely feels like an accomplishment, but by no means do we think we're anywhere near where we want to be.
Watching the growth of the Bitcoin technology as a whole in the past twelve months has been nothing short of amazing, bitcoin exchange rate aside. We are proud to be playing a role in it, no matter how small. Big thanks to all the other bitcoin startups, entrepreneurs, developers, and engineers out there, working thanklessly and tirelessly day in and day out, teaching and inspiring us to keep going and looking forward to a bright future for the industry.
TL DR; Despite the crappy declining bitcoin market, our Bitcoin startup not only survived, but has thrived, growing over fifty-fold in volume, getting funding, expanding to several countries, and has turned one year old.
submitted by Godfreee to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Remittance Startup Hops to Malaysia, Truly Asia.

Bitcoin Remittance Startup Hops to Malaysia, Truly Asia. submitted by k3ik to malaysia [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Remittance Startup BitPesa Launches in Ghana

Bitcoin Remittance Startup BitPesa Launches in Ghana submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Remittance Startup TransferB Wins Deloitte Ireland Tech Competition

Bitcoin Remittance Startup TransferB Wins Deloitte Ireland Tech Competition submitted by bravenewcoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Remittance startup, bags gold at fintech startup challenge

Bitcoin Remittance startup, bags gold at fintech startup challenge submitted by babushka99 to moneytransfer [link] [comments]

BitPesa, Kenyan Bitcoin remittances startup on Monocle 24's The Entrepreneurs podcast (starts at 23:40, Soundcloud link within is maybe quickest access)

BitPesa, Kenyan Bitcoin remittances startup on Monocle 24's The Entrepreneurs podcast (starts at 23:40, Soundcloud link within is maybe quickest access) submitted by imrehg to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Remittance Startup Freemit to Close Amid Funding Shortfall https://t.co/E1rWwEIrx8 https://t.co/1utdtGzFmi

Bitcoin Remittance Startup Freemit to Close Amid Funding Shortfall https://t.co/E1rWwEIrx8 https://t.co/1utdtGzFmi submitted by RimBit to RimbitCrypto [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Remittance Startup Freemit to Close Amid Funding Shortfall

Bitcoin Remittance Startup Freemit to Close Amid Funding Shortfall submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin Remittance Startup Hops to Malaysia, Truly Asia. /r/malaysia

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin Remittance Startup Hops to Malaysia, Truly Asia. /malaysia submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Huge milestone for us: Our Bitcoin Remittance startup Rebit.ph just fulfilled more remittances in just one day today than in our entire first month combined. : Bitcoin

Huge milestone for us: Our Bitcoin Remittance startup Rebit.ph just fulfilled more remittances in just one day today than in our entire first month combined. : Bitcoin submitted by HanumanTheHumane to BitcoinInternational [link] [comments]

Take it from a recovering Bitcoin Remittance startup guy: Bitcoin doesn't actually make remittances cheaper

Take it from a recovering Bitcoin Remittance startup guy: Bitcoin doesn't actually make remittances cheaper submitted by coincrazyy to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Philippines based bitcoin remittance startup raises capital.

Philippines based bitcoin remittance startup raises capital. submitted by babushka99 to rebittance [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Remittance Startup 37coins Announces Closure

Bitcoin Remittance Startup 37coins Announces Closure submitted by BTCNews to BTCNews [link] [comments]

bitcoin remittance startup shuts down

bitcoin remittance startup shuts down submitted by SaveOnSend_com to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

As a Bitcoin startup that endured all the ridicule since 2014, it feels absolutely fantastic to still be here today, growing and thriving.

I was looking for something in my old Reddit posts when I came across some posts from 2014 when we were just a 7-month old Bitcoin startup, and had a good laugh at some of the comments, mostly from Buttcoiners, which ranged from honest questions like how will you make money? to straight up accusations of being scammers in a ponzi scheme just waiting to pounce on our customers once we grow big enough. Things like:
"Once the margins evaporate, they will take all the money and run just like every other exchange."
I totally understood all the skepticism back then, since this was when Mt. Gox was a fresh memory and Bitcoin just crashed from $1200 to $300. People dismissed Bitcoin as dead, as they have done over a hundred times as of today. Hell, even my own family did not believe me, and my own mother thought I could go to jail for what I was doing!
So we built our business model from scratch, had no real experience with startups (my co-founders and I had success in traditional businesses, but that was it), was bootstrapping for more than a year, and was working in an industry seemingly on the brink of collapse. The uncertainty was palpable at that time (2014-2015) with Bitcoin going below $200 at its lowest point, and the doubt was trying its best to creep into our minds.
But we stuck with it and didn't listen to those who said we were crazy.
It makes this recent rally back to new all-time highs a whole lot sweeter, as well as seeing all the amazingly positive developments in the industry as a whole. What a great time to be a bitcoin startup.
So here are some of the things that have happened to us since then:
A year ago, I posted an update on our progress here. It's a pretty long post but it shows some details on what we had done at that point in our growth and development. We've had some solid growth since then, with the Philippine Central Bank publishing numbers on the industry that I would say is on the low end of what we are actually doing today in the terms of transaction volumes.
“Volume is growing. We conducted a survey last year among just the top two players. The volume grew $5 to $6 million a month compared to $2 to $3 million the previous year. It doubled. There was an acceleration. Based on that, we decided to put this on a formal regulatory framework."
We closed our seed round with a major investment from Kakao, a $10 Billion company that basically owns the South Korean mobile chat app market with over 100 million regular users. South Korea is now a hotspot in the region for Bitcoin-remittance startups, with several players getting in on the action. We are leading the pack in this race.
Our business model has spawned several other competitors, which we believe is a really healthy indication that the industry is thriving.
Last week, the Philippine Central Bank released Circular No.944, a piece of regulation on how to do business as a "Virtual Currency exchange". This one is extra special for us, since I and my co-founders personally presented ourselves to the Central Bank and worked closely with them for the last two years in developing the framework for these regulations.
When I say work closely, it means that we were meeting with them regularly, answering all their questions about the local and global Bitcoin industry, presented our business model and used ourselves as the guinea pigs to show them that Bitcoin is a viable technology and business. Imagine the joy we felt when we read these words written right in the guidelines they published:
Section 4512N Guidelines for Virtual Currency Exchanges; Statement of Policy. "...Thus, the Bangko Sentral recognizes that Virtual Currency (VC) systems have the potential to revolutionize delivery of financial services, particularly for payments and remittance, in view of their ability to provide faster and more economical transfer of funds, both domestic and international, and may further support financial inclusion."
So here we are, at the start of 2017, with Bitcoin hitting new all-time highs and holding, the Winklevoss Bitcoin ETF looming on the horizon, Chinese BTC exchanges having less influence on the price, and our industry in this little corner of the world given a green light to pursue our bigger targets.
If you’re new to Bitcoin, I hope you read this and realize that even though the price of Bitcoin acts like a crazy rollercoaster, the work being done by countless developers, entrepreneurs, and professionals on the technology and its applications is for real.
As much as the price of Bitcoin is exciting, it is really the least interesting thing about it once you understand the true potential of the technology.
submitted by Godfreee to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitspark Launches World’s First Stablecoin Pegged to the Hong Kong Dollar

Bitspark Launches World’s First Stablecoin Pegged to the Hong Kong Dollar
A Bitcoin remittance startup located in Hong Kong has announced that it has launched the world’s first stablecoin pegged to the Hong Kong dollar. Founded in 2014, Bitspark was created to enable the process of sending money across borders without the use of banks...
https://btcindex.io/news/bitspark-launches-worlds-first-stablecoin-pegged-to-the-hong-kong-dollar
https://preview.redd.it/qqk8nbp4bid21.png?width=1000&format=png&auto=webp&s=1ab3ddd693ad6ea2c6de28f0688907caf9d044e4
submitted by Dronmm to u/Dronmm [link] [comments]

An interesting contrarian take on Bitcoin's potential for international remittances from SaveOnSend (a website which specialises in finding the best deals for international remittances). Link and most interesting quotes inside.

https://www.saveonsend.com/blog/bitcoin/
The tone of the article is somewhat adversarial to bitcoin, and yet it is based on empirical observations from people who have no vested interest in promoting traditional remittance services instead of bitcoin-based ones. A few points they raise are especially interesting, and are based on more fact and less conjecture than almost everything that /bitcoin has to say on the subject.
If the Bitpesa or Rebit people are reading this I think the community would be interested to see them address these points directly (anyone remembers their reddit handles to summon them?).
"If a bitcoin-based approach is only different in how it moves funds across countries and how it records details of transactions, two conditions would need to be met in order for bitcoin to present a significant cost advantage: a) costs of those specific back-end processes need to be a substantial component of a provider’s P&L, b) existing providers are deploying those processes in a substantially inefficient manner. Reviewing financial statements of publicly-traded companies, one could notice that most of their costs are related to acquisition, channel infrastructure, customer service, and risk management, not in recording transactions or moving money cross-borders."
This reiterates claims that there aren't significant back-end savings to be made by using Bitcoin for remittances, and TimSwanson 's conclusions that rebittance services are only cheaper than the competition because so far they avoid KYC/AML-related costs. I have no idea how remittance companies like WU work behind the scenes (nor does the vast majority of /bitcoin users) and I would like to hear more about this from someone who does.
Another interesting point they raise is the following:
Most of the potential savings in the international remittances could be realized today, immediately, IF only senders stop going to cash agents and spend 3 minutes linking their bank accounts on their smart phones using their existing providers like Western Union or Ria Money Transfer. Not understanding why so many senders continue spending 3-5-10 times more while having a bank account and a smart phone will likely lead to many disappointments for bitcoin remittance startups and their investors down the road.
One of the challenges of rebittance services is convincing new customers to switch to an unfamiliar transaction channel in order to shave a percentage point or two from transaction costs. Given that most people who rely on remittances are impoverished migrant workers who took the trouble of emigrating to a foreign country (often working in humiliating conditions as third-class citizens) just to send a few hundred dollars back home one would imagine that they would be pretty interested in experimenting and discovering the best practices to avoid useless leakage, and that once discovered these best practices would spread like wildfire. And yet, this does not seem to hold true, and inertia triumphs even for people who are savvy enough to go online and look for better ways to send their money home with SaveOnSend. This is counterintuitive to the extreme, and yet it seems empirically true.
Maybe the ideal rebittance killer-app has yet to be dreamed of, or maybe rebittance isn't all that it is cracked up to be.
submitted by amarcord to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

"The key purpose of this article is to examine why after so many years and with so many well-funded startups, Bitcoin/ Blockchain remain irrelevant to remittances (e.g., 0.03% of transfer volume into the Philippines in 2018), while their fiat-based Fintech counterparts continue flourishing."

submitted by dgerard to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Is it really so hard to believe that Bitcoin startups have captured 20% of the ~$200 Million Korea-Philippines remittance market?

Is it really so hard to believe that bitcoin-powered remittances has captured a large % of the market share in the South Korea to Philippines corridor? I would say that without all the obstacles we have faced as a Bitcoin startup and an industry as a whole in the last three years, the number would be much bigger. I think what makes it hard to believe is that most people have this preconceived idea about what “adoption” should look like, meaning people sending BTC to each other directly, abandoning their banks, and never changing BTC to fiat.
A brief background before I get to the details. Since 2013, we have been at the forefront of the Rebittance business with our flagship product Rebit.ph. Building a sustainable, revenue-generating, and even profitable business in a span of 2.5 years is no joke. Building it on top of a nascent technology with no regulation and all the uncertainty attached to it, while bootstrapping the whole thing, makes it closer to impossible. In the process of figuring out the best way to do our business and not just survive, but thrive, we came up with what is now our current business model - use bitcoin as the settlement rail between two business entities across borders. Most of our senders and receivers don’t even know they are using bitcoin.
Our business partners in South Korea are also other Bitcoin companies but specifically tackling the Filipino market. They have many customers, mostly people that send money back home to the Philippines. They still do it the same way they used to do it with western union, but this time, it costs a considerable amount less when they use these alternatives. Our partners take customer fiat, and then uses Rebit to send the money to the Philippines, which we in turn deliver to the recipients as Philippine pesos. Voila! Bitcoin-powered remittance. They are the on-ramp, we are the off-ramp. That’s how it works for every country/corridor we cover.
The Philippines’ received almost thirty billion dollars in remittances last year. The KR-PH corridor is a “measly” >1% of that, or somewhere in the $200 Million range. Is it possible that we, after almost three years of doing this business, along with our partners and even our competitors/clones, are doing $40 Million in volume annually? Yes, of course. It only takes 10,000 customers sending the average $300/month to hit $36M annually. There are at least 60,000 Filipinos in South Korea, so this is not too difficult to imagine. Add the fact that some businesses use the service to settle payroll and do other B2B services, and the number does not seem so large anymore. There are also other external factors in play, like currency restrictions in South Korea for example. There are also two or three major players (including us) in this market, so there is twice or thrice the effort to grow the industry as a whole.
As much as we want to think that all of a sudden, people will just use Bitcoin the way it is “supposed” to be used, that’s not what we face in reality today. Only 3% of the 100 million Filipinos have credit cards, and less than 20% have access to banking, so how can we expect them to, overnight , adopt a new, clunky, unregulated technology? This is why companies that try to come in and offer “new and improved” or high tech solutions struggle to gain traction here (for now)-- changing user behavior ingrained by generations of doing the same thing over and over again takes not just time, but also a transitional process.
By using Bitcoin as the settlement layer, we allow businesses abroad to partner with us and tap into their Filipino market sending money home. The best part here is that it is still cheaper than western union and the like, even with all the “middlemen” between sender and receiver.
Personally, you could call me a Bitcoin purist. I really believe in it, that it is a game changer, that it will be as disruptive in Finance and governance as the Web was to publishing and telecommunications. I sincerely hope one day we won’t need to exchange bitcoin to fiat. But as a fintech startup, a business trying to survive in a cutthroat industry, we needed to be nimble and adaptable. This is why we are doing what we are doing now - we are addressing a problem with a solution that we came up with on the go as we grew our business, and so far, it has been working very well. Hopefully, we are creating a gateway for people to discover Bitcoin and the benefits of the Blockchain for the finance industry.
Edit: added the original article that claimed such numbers and caused a lot of skepticism.
submitted by Godfreee to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is it really so hard to believe that Bitcoin startups have captured ~20% of the Korea to Philippines remittance market?

Is it really so hard to believe that bitcoin-powered remittances has captured a large % of the market share in the South Korea to Philippines corridor? I would say that without all the obstacles we have faced as a Bitcoin startup and an industry as a whole in the last three years, the number would be much bigger. I think what makes it hard to believe is that most people have this preconceived idea about what “adoption” should look like, meaning people sending BTC to each other directly, abandoning their banks, and never changing BTC to fiat.
A brief background before I get to the details. Since 2013, we have been at the forefront of the Rebittance business with our flagship product Rebit.ph. Building a sustainable, revenue-generating, and even profitable business in a span of 2.5 years is no joke. Building it on top of a nascent technology with no regulation and all the uncertainty attached to it, while bootstrapping the whole thing, makes it closer to impossible. In the process of figuring out the best way to do our business and not just survive, but thrive, we came up with what is now our current business model - use bitcoin as the settlement rail between two business entities across borders. Most of our senders and receivers don’t even know they are using bitcoin.
Our business partners in South Korea are also other Bitcoin companies but specifically tackling the Filipino market. They have many customers, mostly people that send money back home to the Philippines. They still do it the same way they used to do it with western union, but this time, it costs a considerable amount less when they use these alternatives. Our partners take customer fiat, and then uses Rebit to send the money to the Philippines, which we in turn deliver to the recipients as Philippine pesos. Voila! Bitcoin-powered remittance. They are the on-ramp, we are the off-ramp. That’s how it works for every country/corridor we cover. By doing this, we can partner with almost anybody in any country (with bitcoin liquidity) to process Rebittances to the Philippines.
The Philippines’ received almost thirty billion dollars in remittances last year. The KR-PH corridor is a “measly” >1% of that, or somewhere in the $200 Million range. Is it possible that we, after almost three years of doing this business, along with our partners and even our competitors/clones, are doing $40 Million in volume annually? Yes, of course. It only takes 10,000 customers sending the average $300/month to hit $36M annually. There are at least 60,000 Filipinos in South Korea, so this is not too difficult to imagine. Add the fact that some businesses use the service to settle payroll and do other B2B services, and the number does not seem so large anymore. There are also other external factors in play, like currency restrictions in South Korea for example. There are also two or three major players (including us) in this market, so there is twice or thrice the effort to grow the industry as a whole.
As much as we want to think that all of a sudden, people will just use Bitcoin the way it is “supposed” to be used, that’s not what we face in reality today. Only 3% of the 100 million Filipinos have credit cards, and less than 20% have access to banking, so how can we expect them to, overnight , adopt a new, clunky, unregulated technology? This is why companies that try to come in and offer “new and improved” or high tech solutions struggle to gain traction here (for now)-- changing user behavior ingrained by generations of doing the same thing over and over again takes not just time, but also a transitional process.
By using Bitcoin as the settlement layer, we allow businesses abroad to partner with us and tap into their Filipino market sending money home. The best part here is that it is STILL CHEAPER than western union and the like, even with all the “middlemen” between sender and receiver.
Personally, you could call me a Bitcoin purist. I really believe in it, that it is a game changer, that it will be as disruptive in Finance and governance as the Web was to publishing and telecommunications. I sincerely hope one day we won’t need to exchange bitcoin to fiat. But as a fintech startup, a business trying to survive in a cutthroat industry, we needed to be nimble and adaptable. This is why we are doing what we are doing now - we are addressing a problem with a solution that we came up with on the go as we grew our business, and so far, it has been working very well. Hopefully, we are creating a gateway for people to discover Bitcoin and the benefits of the Blockchain for the finance industry.
submitted by Godfreee to btc [link] [comments]

The RemTECH Awards Presentation - Hugo Cuevas-Mohr Sending Bitcoin Abroad Wat is Bitcoin remittance? Kenyan Startups Tackle Expensive Remittances Through Bitcoin How to Start a Money Transfer Business  Including Free ...

19 Bitcoin Remittance Startups That Won't Let the Cryptocurrency Die. February 5, 2016. CRYPTO; REMITTANCE; USE CASES; Bitcoin has recently become quite a debatable topic as the opinions are diverse when it comes to the question of whether bitcoin use in terms of security and other risks related to cryptocurrency. There are even some compelling reasons why bitcoin may be dead soon. Despite ... Mit dem Kauf eines Blockchain-Startups lüftet sich der Nebel - zumindest ein bißchen. Viele Fragen bleiben weiterhin offen. ... Ein großes südkoreanisches IT-Unternehmen kauft ein Bitcoin-Remittance Startup aus Manila.Wir nehmen das zum Anlass, um zu schauen, wie weit Bitcoin dabei ist, den Markt der internationalen Überweisungen umzukrempeln. Visa Europa entwickelt Blockchain-Lösung ... Bitcoin and remittance. Bitcoin startups entered the remittance arena with the promise of friction free, extremely low fees, almost instantaneous payments, for any kind of customer all over the world. The case seems perfect: a huge global market where, often not well off, people that spend USD 37.5 billion per year in fees to send money back home to relatives, can dramatically reduce this ... Since late 2013, Bitcoin startups aiming to introduce bitcoin as a remittance solution began to emerge. One of the first Bitcoin startups to do so is Coins.ph, founded by Ron Hose. Coins.ph. Coins.ph launched its platform in 2014, announcing a major partnership with Metrodeal, the largest e-commerce store in the Philippines. Started out as a bitcoin payment processor for merchants and a ... It seems you cannot read a bitcoin article today, without the mention of the word remittance. From US to India to New Zealand and everything in between, fintech startups have been clamoring ...

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The RemTECH Awards Presentation - Hugo Cuevas-Mohr

Bitcoin Africa Conference 2015 - http://bitcoinconference.co.za/ It’s been declared dead countless times in the West, but in Kenya's start-up scene Bitcoin is all the rage. Kenyan companies have been attracting funding lat... Check out CryptoTab (PC, Android, iOS): https://bit.ly/3cDT3Po Do you want to know how to make $700 by mining bitcoins on your PC and smartphone in 2020? Che... In this episode, Faisal Khan interviews Luis Buenaventura, author of “Reinventing Remittances with Bitcoin“. Luis is one of the early pioneers in the Bitcoin Remittance space. The concise book ... As promised in the video, you can now get your 3 free gifts, here: https://www.bizmove.com/business-gifts.htm Here’s what you get: 1. An Extensive Business P...

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